Jeans

Separation Agreements/h2>

Jeans

Separation Agreements

Separation Agreements

Practical Guides

AN OVERVIEW OF THE BASICS

Putting Your Agreements In Writing.

Know The Facts, Know the Law!

  • Separation Agreements
  • Separation Agreements - A written contract drafted in terms agreed by you and your ex partner or spouse. A separation agreement should deal with all the issues arising from the breakdown of your relationship or marriage.

  • Prenuptial Agreements
  • Prenuptial Agreements - Written agreements entered into before you get married. Particularly useful if one or both of you have been married before. People often wonder if there is anything they can do to make sure their children are financially protected should the marriage break down

  • Cohabitation Agreements
  • Cohabitation Agreements - If you’re moving in together, it may be a good idea to put something in writing. This is especially helpful if one of you is putting down a deposit on the house or you have borrowed money from relatives to do this.

  • Parenting Agreements
  • Parenting Agreements - What is the legal status of these? Is there any point in having one? If you sign a Parenting Agreement do you have to stick to it?

  • Interim Agreements
  • Interim Agreements - Sometimes you need a short written agreement before you’ve made up your mind about all the issues arising from the breakdown of your relationship or marriage. Interim agreements often relate to the sale of a house or care of the children.

    (Above are some of the common agreements used in family situations

    mediation are not legally binding in the sense of being enforceable in a court, but many find that by using a third party they avoid the adversarial conflict and stress that can be generated by a full blown legal action.

    The cost of mediation depends on what mediation you use, it is not free but usually cheaper than each party employing a lawyer. If you are looking at all the options available ask or request more information using our free legal family expert lawyer finder.

    Remember that mediators are neutral and will not take sides. They will not give advice to either party. They will usually recommend that you obtain legal advice alongside the mediation process if required and will guide you as to when this should happen.Once you have proposals you both find acceptable the mediator will prepare a summary of them together with a summary of the financial information which will be sent to each of you. Ask one of our expert family lawyers for more information.

    Many separating couples find it helpful to enter into a written separation agreement (known as a Minute of Agreement) with their spouse/ex-partner in relation to all the issues arising from the breakdown of their marriage/relationship.

    Minute of Agreement, or a Separation Agreement is the equivalent of a ‘contract’ entered into by yourself and your spouse/partner. This can be registered with the Books of Council and Session. The terms of your Separation Agreement will depend on a number of factors. Every agreement is different and individual to each couple: do you want to sell the house, keep it in joint names, have it transferred to one of you, can you afford to buy the other party out, what is to happen with the mortgage, will the other party move out right away, will they rent a property, will you both live in the same house for a period of time, what about the children, who will they stay with, if they stay with mum when will they see dad and vice versa, will one of you pay money to the other in relation to the children and other matters, if so, how much and how often, will the children stay overnight with the other parent, what about holidays, what about childcare cost, what about pensions, have you and your spouse run up a lot of debt, who incurred the debt, what was it for, who is going to pay it off, will you both pay it or will one of you pay more than the other, will all of the debt be paid off from the sale proceeds of the house. All of these points and many others can be discussed and agreed with your spouse/partner prior to meeting with your solicitor. Alternatively these issues can be negotiated on your behalf by your solicitor. It can often take some time for the terms of your Minute of Agreement to be finalised. Our family law panel firms have a great deal of experience and expertise in this area

    Interim Minutes of Agreement - Sometimes an agreement is needed immediately, prior to you and your spouse/partner having reached agreement on the final terms of your main Separation Agreement. Interim agreements may be required to allow the family home to be sold or in relation to contact arrangements for the children. At Nero Legal we are experienced in drafting these agreements as instructed by you.

    First steps - You and your spouse/partner should try your utmost to sit down and talk things over prior to the separation. This may be very difficult, especially if you do not want the separation and are hurt and upset. In some circumstances it might be helpful to involve another family member such as a grandparent or sibling. This can help when dealing with emotions which are running high. You should note points down that you are able to agree upon.

    Cohabitation and Pre-nuptial Agreements - These agreements are not as common as separation agreements. The old saying, “prevention is better than cure” may be very appropriate when two people start their life together. The drawing up of a pre-nuptial agreement ensures that you have thought about the issues that might lead to difficulties in future, in the event of the breakdown of the marriage or relationship. At Nero Legal we can talk through your options and set out your wishes in a document which, though not binding in law, will be taken into account in the event of a future relationship breakdown.

    With the help of our family law team, they will discuss with you the law which applies in relation to your separation, and if necessary they can negotiate with your spouse on your behalf. If it transpires that you cannot reach an amicable settlement and you feel your case will have to go to court then they will assist you with that but this is something that we will try to avoid if at all possible.

    Taking your Instructions Your initial ‘consultation’ can be conducted over the telephone if that suits you but if you would prefer a face to face meeting this can be arranged. We appreciate that often it can be difficult to arrange time off work to attend appointments. As such our panels firms are all happy to work with you and fit in with your requirements. They can take your on-going instructions over the phone or by email. This helps to minimise the disruption to your day to day life.

    Many separating couples find it helpful to enter into a written separation agreement (known as a Minute of Agreement) with their spouse/ex-partner in relation to all the issues arising from the breakdown of their marriage/relationship.

    Minute of Agreement, or a Separation Agreement is the equivalent of a ‘contract’ entered into by yourself and your spouse/partner. This can be registered with the Books of Council and Session. The terms of your Separation Agreement will depend on a number of factors. Every agreement is different and individual to each couple: do you want to sell the house, keep it in joint names, have it transferred to one of you, can you afford to buy the other party out, what is to happen with the mortgage, will the other party move out right away, will they rent a property, will you both live in the same house for a period of time, what about the children, who will they stay with, if they stay with mum when will they see dad and vice versa, will one of you pay money to the other in relation to the children and other matters, if so, how much and how often, will the children stay overnight with the other parent, what about holidays, what about childcare cost, what about pensions, have you and your spouse run up a lot of debt, who incurred the debt, what was it for, who is going to pay it off, will you both pay it or will one of you pay more than the other, will all of the debt be paid off from the sale proceeds of the house. All of these points and many others can be discussed and agreed with your spouse/partner prior to meeting with your solicitor. Alternatively these issues can be negotiated on your behalf by your solicitor. It can often take some time for the terms of your Minute of Agreement to be finalised. Our family law panel firms have a great deal of experience and expertise in this area

    Interim Minutes of Agreement - Sometimes an agreement is needed immediately, prior to you and your spouse/partner having reached agreement on the final terms of your main Separation Agreement. Interim agreements may be required to allow the family home to be sold or in relation to contact arrangements for the children. At Nero Legal we are experienced in drafting these agreements as instructed by you.

    Divorce Law Finder is an Official Scottish Divorce & Separation Platform - Divorce Lawyers & Separation Agreements

    All data & information is GDPR secured (Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018)) registered with the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) under our Terms & Conditions.

    Divorce Advice
    Legal Quick Guides

    Separation Advice
    Legal Quick Guides

    Family Agreements
    Legal Quick Guides

    Planning Ahead
    Legal Quick Guides

    Understanding your rights and the law
    Facts about divorce & separation in Scotland.

    Separation Agreements

    Practical Guides

    AN OVERVIEW OF THE BASICS

    Putting Your Agreements In Writing.

    Know The Facts, Know the Law!

  • Separation Agreements
  • Separation Agreements - A written contract drafted in terms agreed by you and your ex partner or spouse. A separation agreement should deal with all the issues arising from the breakdown of your relationship or marriage.

  • Prenuptial Agreements
  • Prenuptial Agreements - Written agreements entered into before you get married. Particularly useful if one or both of you have been married before. People often wonder if there is anything they can do to make sure their children are financially protected should the marriage break down

  • Cohabitation Agreements
  • Cohabitation Agreements - If you’re moving in together, it may be a good idea to put something in writing. This is especially helpful if one of you is putting down a deposit on the house or you have borrowed money from relatives to do this.

  • Parenting Agreements
  • Parenting Agreements - What is the legal status of these? Is there any point in having one? If you sign a Parenting Agreement do you have to stick to it?

  • Interim Agreements
  • Interim Agreements - Sometimes you need a short written agreement before you’ve made up your mind about all the issues arising from the breakdown of your relationship or marriage. Interim agreements often relate to the sale of a house or care of the children.

    (Above are some of the common agreements used in family situations

    mediation are not legally binding in the sense of being enforceable in a court, but many find that by using a third party they avoid the adversarial conflict and stress that can be generated by a full blown legal action.

    The cost of mediation depends on what mediation you use, it is not free but usually cheaper than each party employing a lawyer. If you are looking at all the options available ask or request more information using our free legal family expert lawyer finder.

    Remember that mediators are neutral and will not take sides. They will not give advice to either party. They will usually recommend that you obtain legal advice alongside the mediation process if required and will guide you as to when this should happen.Once you have proposals you both find acceptable the mediator will prepare a summary of them together with a summary of the financial information which will be sent to each of you. Ask one of our expert family lawyers for more information.

    Many separating couples find it helpful to enter into a written separation agreement (known as a Minute of Agreement) with their spouse/ex-partner in relation to all the issues arising from the breakdown of their marriage/relationship.

    Minute of Agreement, or a Separation Agreement is the equivalent of a ‘contract’ entered into by yourself and your spouse/partner. This can be registered with the Books of Council and Session. The terms of your Separation Agreement will depend on a number of factors. Every agreement is different and individual to each couple: do you want to sell the house, keep it in joint names, have it transferred to one of you, can you afford to buy the other party out, what is to happen with the mortgage, will the other party move out right away, will they rent a property, will you both live in the same house for a period of time, what about the children, who will they stay with, if they stay with mum when will they see dad and vice versa, will one of you pay money to the other in relation to the children and other matters, if so, how much and how often, will the children stay overnight with the other parent, what about holidays, what about childcare cost, what about pensions, have you and your spouse run up a lot of debt, who incurred the debt, what was it for, who is going to pay it off, will you both pay it or will one of you pay more than the other, will all of the debt be paid off from the sale proceeds of the house. All of these points and many others can be discussed and agreed with your spouse/partner prior to meeting with your solicitor. Alternatively these issues can be negotiated on your behalf by your solicitor. It can often take some time for the terms of your Minute of Agreement to be finalised. Our family law panel firms have a great deal of experience and expertise in this area

    Interim Minutes of Agreement - Sometimes an agreement is needed immediately, prior to you and your spouse/partner having reached agreement on the final terms of your main Separation Agreement. Interim agreements may be required to allow the family home to be sold or in relation to contact arrangements for the children. At Nero Legal we are experienced in drafting these agreements as instructed by you.

    First steps - You and your spouse/partner should try your utmost to sit down and talk things over prior to the separation. This may be very difficult, especially if you do not want the separation and are hurt and upset. In some circumstances it might be helpful to involve another family member such as a grandparent or sibling. This can help when dealing with emotions which are running high. You should note points down that you are able to agree upon.

    Cohabitation and Pre-nuptial Agreements - These agreements are not as common as separation agreements. The old saying, “prevention is better than cure” may be very appropriate when two people start their life together. The drawing up of a pre-nuptial agreement ensures that you have thought about the issues that might lead to difficulties in future, in the event of the breakdown of the marriage or relationship. At Nero Legal we can talk through your options and set out your wishes in a document which, though not binding in law, will be taken into account in the event of a future relationship breakdown.

    With the help of our family law team, they will discuss with you the law which applies in relation to your separation, and if necessary they can negotiate with your spouse on your behalf. If it transpires that you cannot reach an amicable settlement and you feel your case will have to go to court then they will assist you with that but this is something that we will try to avoid if at all possible.

    Taking your Instructions Your initial ‘consultation’ can be conducted over the telephone if that suits you but if you would prefer a face to face meeting this can be arranged. We appreciate that often it can be difficult to arrange time off work to attend appointments. As such our panels firms are all happy to work with you and fit in with your requirements. They can take your on-going instructions over the phone or by email. This helps to minimise the disruption to your day to day life.

    Many separating couples find it helpful to enter into a written separation agreement (known as a Minute of Agreement) with their spouse/ex-partner in relation to all the issues arising from the breakdown of their marriage/relationship.

    Minute of Agreement, or a Separation Agreement is the equivalent of a ‘contract’ entered into by yourself and your spouse/partner. This can be registered with the Books of Council and Session. The terms of your Separation Agreement will depend on a number of factors. Every agreement is different and individual to each couple: do you want to sell the house, keep it in joint names, have it transferred to one of you, can you afford to buy the other party out, what is to happen with the mortgage, will the other party move out right away, will they rent a property, will you both live in the same house for a period of time, what about the children, who will they stay with, if they stay with mum when will they see dad and vice versa, will one of you pay money to the other in relation to the children and other matters, if so, how much and how often, will the children stay overnight with the other parent, what about holidays, what about childcare cost, what about pensions, have you and your spouse run up a lot of debt, who incurred the debt, what was it for, who is going to pay it off, will you both pay it or will one of you pay more than the other, will all of the debt be paid off from the sale proceeds of the house. All of these points and many others can be discussed and agreed with your spouse/partner prior to meeting with your solicitor. Alternatively these issues can be negotiated on your behalf by your solicitor. It can often take some time for the terms of your Minute of Agreement to be finalised. Our family law panel firms have a great deal of experience and expertise in this area

    Interim Minutes of Agreement - Sometimes an agreement is needed immediately, prior to you and your spouse/partner having reached agreement on the final terms of your main Separation Agreement. Interim agreements may be required to allow the family home to be sold or in relation to contact arrangements for the children. At Nero Legal we are experienced in drafting these agreements as instructed by you.

    DIVORCE & SEPARATION LAWYERS

    Looking For the Best Divorce Lawyers Fees? - Prd by JLQ©


    GET ADVICE & CALCULATE YOUR COSTS

    Official Scottish Legal Divorce Law Finder - Prd by JLQ©

    Divorce Advice
    Quick Legal Guides

    Separation Advice
    Quick Legal Guides

    Family Agreements
    Quick Legal Guides

    Disputes & Mediation
    Quick Legal Guides

    Scottish Divorce Law
    Know The Facts

    10 Essential Facts
    Legal Quick Guides

    Divorce Facts
    Know The Law

    Planning Ahead
    Legal Quick Guides

    DIVORCE & SEPARATION LAWYERS

    Looking For the Best Divorce Lawyers Fees? - Prd by JLQ©


    GET ADVICE & CALCULATE YOUR COSTS

    Official Scottish Legal Divorce Law Finder - Prd by JLQ©

    Divorce Advice
    Quick Legal Guides

    Separation Advice
    Quick Legal Guides

    Family Agreements
    Quick Legal Guides

    Disputes & Mediation
    Quick Legal Guides

    Scottish Divorce Law
    Know The Facts

    10 Essential Facts
    Legal Quick Guides

    Divorce Facts
    Know The Law

    Planning Ahead
    Legal Quick Guides

    Divorce Law Finder is an Official Scottish Divorce & Separation Platform - Divorce Lawyers & Separation Agreements

    All data & information is GDPR secured (Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018)) registered with the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) under our Terms & Conditions.

    Divorce Advice
    Legal Quick Guides

    Separation Advice
    Legal Quick Guides

    Family Agreements
    Legal Quick Guides

    Planning Ahead
    Legal Quick Guides

    Understanding your rights and the law
    Facts about divorce & separation in Scotland.

    Powered by Divorce law Finder Copyright © 2020 Divorce and Separation Lawyer Finder - Scottish Family Law Experts Theme: CF.Home by CF Marketing. Proudly powered by JLQ.

    Powered by Divorce law Finder Copyright © 2020 Divorce and Separation Lawyer Finder - Scottish Family Law Experts Theme: CF.Home by CF Marketing. Proudly powered by JLQ.

    Powered by JLQ & Divorce Law Finder

    NEWSLETTER

    Sign up to our mailing list to receive updates on new arrivals and special offers.